Close

Logolog (@logolog) is a logo design blog focusing on wit and lateral thinking in logo design. The logos featured here made me smile and wish I had thought of them first! I like it when logos take me by surprise, either with unexpected associations or playful ideas.

Enjoy.
Denis Radenkovic,
September, 2004

John Langdon

Aquarius Advisers is a marketing & communications consulting firm. The name was chosen as a sign of the times, astrologically speaking, as we have recently entered the Age of Aquarius. There was some deeper thinking behind the name than a cursory thought might suggest. The Age of Aquarius is an age of enlightenment and insight. People born under the sign are said to be interested in science and new ideas. That concept resonated well with the CEO’s background in technology. Aquarians are also philanthropists and are passionate about causes. This aspect appealed to his more recent interests which include cause marketing, social marketing and doing promotional work for non-profits.

The imagery inherent in the name called for direct reference to water, and water’s quality of being constantly in motion nicely accompanies the idea of a dynamic business world. Western cultures see progressive motion as being from left to right the direction we read, and the direction that italic letterforms lean. The use of a cap A and a lower case A sidesteps the redundancy pitfalls that might be encountered using two caps, and subtly keeps the attention on “Aquarius” as opposed to the more generic term “Advisers”.

John Langdon

Aquarius Advisers Sketches and Roughs

The reciprocal equality inherent in the situation was nicely paralleled by the two three letter words. This immediately suggested a yin/yang integration of give and take that could be symbolized by the interstitial relationship between black and white letters. Soon, finding themselves amorously intertwined, the letters were rolling around uncontrollably in a ball, and an extremely happy human face emerged from the entanglement. The carnival huckster just seemed to have the most appropriate expression.

BIG FUN

The Big Fun logo was done as an extracurricular project for a long-time friend and business associate. The term honors a private amusement between consenting adults that was characterized by an unabashed prurient and lascivious joy.

Big Fun Sketches and Roughs

The reciprocal equality inherent in the situation was nicely paralleled by the two three letter words. This immediately suggested a yin/yang integration of give and take that could be symbolized by the interstitial relationship between black and white letters. Soon, finding themselves amorously intertwined, the letters were rolling around uncontrollably in a ball, and an extremely happy human face emerged from the entanglement. The carnival huckster just seemed to have the most appropriate expression.

JTL

In the long-shot hope that a unique but professional-looking logo on her new custom-built bike frame might prove helpful should it ever be stolen, my adult daughter asked me to create a logo with her initials. (This being a pro-bono job, I skipped the exploratory sketches and went right to Adobe Illustrator.) Like my JWL initials, Jessica’s JTL has a natural built in bi-lateral symmetry. There’s something nice about that, of course, unless you’re a logo designer who likes to force asymmetrical letters into unexpected symmetries. But I started out yielding to the obvious (fig.1). Having gotten that out of my system, I looked for a way to break the symmetry and also happened to see the possibility of creating a human face (fig.2). This direction allowed for a reference to the 20th century smiley, but with an appropriately ironic, 21st century smirk. Too cutesy. I can’t recall now in which of the first two solutions I saw the front view of a bicycle tire, handlebars, and legs and feet, but suddenly, there it was. The piston-like, yin/yang relationship of the pedaling motion provided the hoped-for asymmetry. Or perhaps the hope for asymmetry led to the discovery of the bike imagery

KINGS HILL

This was one of those situation where the name undeniably called for the logo, and I just did what had to be done. Despite the client’s stated mandate that they did not want any pictures of crowns. So I gave them a hill. With four apple trees. They rejected the design. I’m guessing they didn’t like the trees.

More (clever) logos

Interview: One of a series of magazine department headings
New York Fashion Industry: Created for competition sponsored by Gloria Vanderbilt/Murjani.

Posted on

November 19, 2006

BROWSE LOGOLOG